Pride and Prejudice: A Feminist Criticism

A/N: This week’s post is an academic essay on Pride and Prejudice with a focus on feminism. 


The iconic story of Pride and Prejudice was published in 1813, but even though it was written by Jane Austen it was not published under her name. This was because that during the beginning of the nineteenth century, it was still considered shocking and scandalous for a woman to write for money.

This meant that when a book was published under an anonymous name it was often because it was in fact written by a woman. This also held true for the rest of Austen’s published work such as Sense and Sensibility, which was also published anonymously.

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Round 1: In Which Stephenie Meyer Confuses Feminism With Kung Fu.

Here’s the second part of Harry Potter vs. Twilight by IfByYes. This time the battle concerns feminism. Please let me know what you think!

If By Yes

(A note about spoilers: I will keep Harry Potter spoilers to a minimum, only letting go the kind of information that you could pick up from your standard movie trailer and have probably picked up on already, unless you live in a world without other people. Twilight spoilers, on the other hand, abound, because I can’t “spoil” Twilight any more than I can “spoil” a compost heap.)

The main protagonist of Harry Potter is a boy, while the protagonist of Twilight is a girl, so you’d think that Twilight would be more feminist in its message.

But anyone who has read that series would laugh hysterically at the suggestion that it was anything other than unempowering anti-feminist sludge. Well, anyone except the author.

Can you FEEL the girl power?

Stephanie Meyer doesn’t agree with the rest of the Western World that Twilight is sexist codswallop.

Sure, Bella is pretty…

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The Evolved Feminism of Disney Princesses

A/N: Okay, this is the very first Academic Essay I’ve put out to the world to see.

The title is pretty self-explanatory, and it’s basically a comparison of the feministic qualities found in Snow White, Belle and Elsa. 

Enjoy!



“Within a month, Daisy threw a tantrum, when I tried to wrestle her into pants. As if by osmosis she had learned the names and gown colours of every Disney Princess… She gazed longingly into the tulle-draped windows of the local toy stores and for her third birthday begged for a ‘real princess dress’ with matching plastic high heels” (Orenstein).

Unsurprisingly this representative of a little girl’s adoration for Disney is merely one of many examples, which concerns the popularity of the Disney Princesses, whom are idealized by millions of young girls, and, probably, boys, across the globe. They are in control of monumental impact and influence. One of these influences deals with feminism.

What does the media of Disney teach little girls about what implementations there are to be female? The feminism in the media of the Disney princesses has evolved through the decades, which can be assessed through an analysis of the movies of only three selected Disney princesses; Snow White, Belle and Elsa.

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